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DISC hydrator by Posture Pump: Are you sick and tired of back pain and disc compression? Are you losing your postural curves? One-stop relief for your sore back by decompressing, shaping and lubricating the spine. Disc Hydrator decompresses joints and hydrates discs as it aligns vertebra into their natural curved shape.

September 7th, 2012 Comments off

DISC hydrator by Posture Pump: Are you sick and tired of back pain and disc compression? Are you losing your postural curves? One-stop relief for your sore back by decompressing, shaping and lubricating the spine. Disc Hydrator decompresses joints and hydrates discs as it aligns vertebra into their natural curved shape.

  • Expanding Ellipsoidal Decompression (EED) via Posture Pump.
  • 2 uniquely angled air cells create multi-vectored force. Easy to inflate and deflate for maximum healing and pleasure. Beautifully designed, made in USA, built to last with high quality hard plastic. 1 year warranty. Built-in Rocking Mechanism allows you to exercise your abdominal muscles while shaping and strengthening the lower back

    Lightweight, portable, easy to carry for travel or office break. Recommended for use as often as you want.

The choice is yours! Disc Hydrator by Posture Pump gradually lifts, stretches and separates back joints into the correct curved shape. If the spine loses its curved shape, the discs are compressed and rich lubricating fluid can not penetrate (see pictures). This causes premature aging in the form of dry stiff joints. Disc with hydrator, the spine is stretched and bent over a unique angled air cells, compression is removed from the discs and nutrient-rich fluid can now be included. So,

List Price: $ 195.00 Price: $ 138.00

February 2nd, 2009 No comments
Peter sams asked:

Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem that can range from a dull, constant ache to a sudden, sharp pain that leaves you incapacitated. It can come on suddenly – from an accident, a fall, or lifting something too heavy – or it can develop slowly, perhaps as the result of age-related changes to the spine. Regardless of how it happens or how it feels, you know it when you have it. And chances are, if you don’t have it now, you will eventually.

Lower back pain, also known as lumbago, affects 7 out of 10 people at some time in their lives. Low back pain means a pain or ache anywhere on your back, in between the bottom of the ribs and the top of the legs.

The pain can come on suddenly, slowly or be the direct result of a fall or injury.

There are many causes of back pain.

• The most common cause is a strain of the back, which is a small tear of the back muscles or ligaments. This usually results from a sudden or awkward movement, or from lifting a heavy object. But often, a person can’t remember a particular incident that brought on the pain.

• Other common causes include poor muscle tone in the back, tension or spasm of the back muscles and problems with the joints that make up the back.

The symptoms for back pain are:

• Persistent aching or stiffness anywhere along your spine, from the base of the neck to the hips.

• Sharp, localized pain in the neck, upper back, or lower back — especially after lifting heavy objects or engaging in other strenuous activity.

• Chronic ache in the middle or lower back, especially after sitting or standing for extended periods.

Types of Back Pain

Acute pain

One common type of pain is acute pain, currently defined as pain lasting less than 3 to 6 months, or pain that is directly related to tissue damage. This is the kind of pain that is experienced from a paper cut or needle prick. Other examples of acute pain include:

• Touching a hot stove or iron. This pain will cause a fast, immediate, intense pain with an almost simultaneous withdrawal of the body part that is being burned. More of an aching pain might be experience a few seconds after the initial pain and withdrawal.

Chronic back pain

Typically persists longer than the expected healing time for the identified cause of the pain—such as low back surgery—or persists after the identified cause of the pain has been treated.

Osteoarthritis

This is a long-term degeneration of the joints, which makes them less able to withstand stress. It’s a wear-and-tear problem that affects most of us as we get older and which can give rise to pain in some cases.

Exercises to minimize problems with back pain

You can minimize problems with back pain with exercises that make the muscles in your back, stomach, hips and thighs strong and flexible. Some people keep in good physical condition by being active in recreational activities like running, walking, bike riding, and swimming. In addition to these conditioning activities, there are specific exercises that are directed toward strengthening and stretching your back, stomach, hip and thigh muscles.

JAMEY

January 23rd, 2009 No comments
Bruce Bailey, Ph.d. asked:

Perhaps the hardest part of having arthritis or a related condition is the pain that usually accompanies it. Managing and understanding that pain, and the impact it has on one’s life, is a big issue with most arthritis sufferers. The first step in managing arthritis pain is knowing which type of arthritis or condition you have, because that will help determine your treatment. Before learning different management techniques, however, it’s important to understand some concepts about pain.

No. 1: Not All Pain is Alike

Just as there are different types of arthritis, there are also different types of pain. Even your own pain may vary from day to day.

No. 2: The Purpose of Pain

Pain is your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong, or that you need to act. If you touch a hot stove, pain signals from your brain tell you to pull your hand away. This type of pain helps protect you. Chronic, long-lasting pain, like the kind that accompanies arthritis, is different. While it tells you that something is wrong, it often isn’t as easy to relieve.

No. 3: Causes of Pain

Arthritis pain is caused by several factors, such as (1) Inflammation, the process that causes the redness and swelling in your joints; (2) Damage to joint tissues, which results from the disease process or from stress, injury or pressure on the joints; (3) Fatigue resulting from the disease process, which can make pain worse and more difficult to bear; and (4) Depression or stress, which results from limited movement or no longer doing activities you enjoy.

No. 4: Pain Factors

Things such as stress, anxiety, depression or simply “overdoing it” can make pain worse. This often leads to a decrease in physical activity, causing further anxiety and depression, resulting in a downward spiral of ever-increasing pain.

No. 5: Different Reactions to Pain

People react differently to pain. Mentally, you can get caught in a cycle of pain, stress and depression, often resulting from the inability to perform certain functions, which makes managing pain and arthritis seem more difficult. Physically, pain increases the sensitivity of your nervous system and the severity of your arthritis. Emotional and social factors include your fears and anxieties about pain, previous experiences with pain, energy level, attitude about your condition and the way people around you react to pain.

No. 6: Managing Your Pain

Arthritis may limit some of the things you can do, but it doesn’t have to control your life. One way to reduce your pain is to build your life around wellness, not pain or sickness. This means taking positive action. Your mind plays an important role in how you feel pain and respond to illness.

Many people with arthritis have found that by learning and practicing pain management skills, they can reduce their pain. Thinking of pain as a signal to take positive action rather than an ordeal you have to endure can help you learn to manage your pain. You can counteract the downward spiral of pain by practicing relaxation techniques, regular massage, hot and cold packs, moderate exercise, and keeping a positive mental outlook. And humor always has a cathartic effect.

No. 7: Don’t focus on pain.

The amount of time you spend thinking about pain has a lot to do with how much discomfort you feel. People who dwell on their pain usually say their pain is worse than those who don’t dwell on it. One way to take your mind off pain is to distract yourself from pain. Focus on something outside your body, perhaps a hobby or something of personal interest, to take your mind off your discomfort.

No. 8: Think positively. What we say to ourselves often determines what we do and how we look at life. A positive outlook will get you feeling better about yourself, and help to take your mind off your pain. Conversely, a negative outlook sends messages to yourself that often lead to increased pain, or at least the feeling that the pain is worse. So, “in with the good, and out with the bad.”

Reinforce your positive attitude by rewarding yourself each time you think about or do something positive. Take more time for yourself. Talk to your doctor about additional ways to manage pain.

Bruce Bailey, Ph.D.

DANNIE